Challenge

Imagine you are on a voyage(Journey) to find an island. But somewhere in the middle, you lost track and got stuck in the bad weather of the sea; it’s raining and Storm is all around. Your friends are scared of what is going to happen. Will the ship be strong enough for this bad weather?
Suppose you are the engineer on this ship, and you can make anything like the iron man. And the engineer is known for solving problems. The ship caption lost consciousness, hitting his head while the ship got jerked because of storms. How will you save your friends because everyone is scared and no one is thinking of saving themself and others?
Suppose you are the engineer on this ship, and you can make anything like the iron man. And the engineer is known for solving problems. The ship caption lost consciousness, hitting his head while the ship got jerked because of storms. How will you save your friends because everyone is scared and no one is thinking of saving themself and others?

Best Answer- 

Swarup Bhattarai

Fair wind and following seas – that’s what we hoped before every sailing. But sometimes,
nature can be upsetting, and the weather hit our ship in the open sea with no time to react. We
never received a pre-weather notice for a route change, and it appeared that we would confront
large surf in the hostile sea.
Inside my cabin, I was reading Joseph Conrad, “the true tranquility of God begins a
thousand miles from the nearest shore,” while listening to the crews’ sea-shanties.
There was an abrupt change in the weather. The sky darkened, and the ocean got
impatient. I did not bother – I’d just lied down to fantasize about the island we would discover…
Unlimited possibilities.

Suddenly, there was an unsettling quietness among the crews. “Captain downed,” a
scared voice said. “Yer fond of wheels, ser?”

I hurried to the deck; the captain, on the floor; the crews, rushing around headless; no
shore in sight. All I could think about was Joseph Conrad, but it wasn’t the time to ponder about
God. We’d already lost communication with the port. We lit the emergency flare, but who would
locate us midst of the sea?

My father fought the Korean War. I recall him telling me about Kanaloa, his submarine.
My first instinct was to convert the boat into a submarine. The team laughed at the idea, but it
was our only option at the time.
That we did…
We assembled, built the model, and updated the muster list. Some of the 35 crews were
instructed to go food hunting. Others maneuvered themselves around the submarine.

Step one – Rig the shade. Fortunately, we had few materials for the island. We built the
shade in a single day. Another day for the submarine’s base model.

Our main issue was keeping the pressure hull robust. It didn’t appear to be a problem,
but deep atmosphere loaded the system. The hull had to be built to withstand an unexpected
depth-excursion induced by ballasting and flooding. An electric motor, powered by lead-acid
batteries, drove the propeller. With diesel unavailable, we chose gas to charge the batteries.

The final challenge – Few were beginning to get skeptical. We now had to keep the sub’s
environment breathable.

“Keep enough air, reduce CO2.”

Monitoring O2, H2, and CO2… ALL READY, SIRRRRRR…

We had scuba emergency kits but no surface navigators. In case we failed, we would most
likely die. We made a depth gauge to track battery, trim levels, and buoyancy in the piloting
system. Bearable, we had a fish-finder sonar. With God’s grace, we hoped the transducer could
endure our design depth and safety margin.

All compartments, secure phones.
Section one, Section two, SECTION THUH-REE.
Rig for dive.
Final trim, six-fi-yiv feet.
Request speed.
Take her down.

There it was, Kanaloa, 65 feet below the ocean – the smirk upon every ear, the blistering
optimism in every eye – we assessed the ducts and flood barriers and pumped our breath.

17 days till the shore.